How to Provide Grief Support for the Loved Ones Left Behind

The usual condolences are often not enough to console someone who has recently experienced the loss of a loved one. Many of us want to help grieving friends and family but do not know how.

Here are some ways on how you can offer grief support in Indiana:

Spend Time With Your Friend or Family Member.

Sometimes people don’t want to talk to a grieving person because they don’t know what to say. In most cases, however, you do not have to say anything. Your presence is all that is needed to make them feel your support.

Be Patient.

You don’t need to ask them about how they feel or if they are all right. Be patient and let them process their grief. For some people, recounting the details of the death of their loved one can be part of the grieving process. Even if you are aware of the story and have heard it many times, listening to your friend or family member is what they need.

Don’t Wait for the Grieving Person to Seek Your Help.

Take the initiative in providing or doing things for a person in grief. If they need food, groceries, help with the house chores, and even company, willingly provide them what they need. Refrain from asking because in most cases, they will turn down your offer to avoid bothering you.

Understand the Grieving Process.

Grief comes in five stages. These include denial, bargaining, anger, dealing with depression, and acceptance. Allow your friend to lash out and rant, and understand that it is nothing personal.

Attend a Grief or Support Group With the Grieving Person.

If your grieving friend expresses a need to come to a group meeting for grief support in Indiana, you should offer to come with them so that they will feel your support.

Don’t Offer Any Advice.

Offering advice may come across as making the situation all about you. Let the grieving person discuss their feelings and emotions and only listen.

These are only a few things that you can do to help a grieving person recover. Losing someone you love can be devastating, but acceptance may come easier with someone helping you cope.>